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How Long Does it Take to Repipe a House?

Nothing lasts forever in this world, and your home’s plumbing fixtures and piping are no exception. Your piping can begin to rust, rot, and corrode over time. Though you can patch individual areas, history shows that these problems will eventually become a problem in your entire plumbing system if you don’t replace your plumbing system.

Leaks, floods, and low water pressure are the most common issues. It might be the time to consider having your home repiped if you have an older piping network and have some of the above problems. Repiping seems to be a lengthy and time-consuming procedure. 

It is, however, a procedure that can be completed in 3–5 days by experienced plumbers like those at Hansen’s Plumbing (in some cases quicker). Learn more about the stages of repiping and how to tell when it’s time to repipe your home in the sections below.

Repiping Your Home in Stages

The process of repiping a home is divided into four stages. Overall, you can only be without water for 1–2 days. In most instances, your water will be switched off in the morning before the repiping process starts and turns back on that evening. However, this could take longer in some situations. It’s essential to know how long the project will take so that you can prepare appropriately.

Preparation

Preparation work is needed for the job to be done successfully, as it is for most plumbing projects. Repiping entails removing all of your home’s water supply piping and replacing it with new piping. A plumber would most likely need to cut holes in your drywall and possibly other areas to test your pipes properly. After the inspection, the plumber will let you know if there are any other parts of the house that they will need access to during the job.

Getting a Permit

In several states, obtaining a permit is required before beginning a repiping project. Furthermore, it will be expected to pass a state inspection once completed. It is highly recommended that you hire a contractor to do this for you. Otherwise, the procedure may be perplexing.

Drywall Removal

Your contractor will need to remove some areas of your drywall altogether before repiping can begin (not just cut holes). They’ll move your furniture out of the way and remove any fixtures blocking their access to the pipes. Your contractor will inspect the water supply system after the repiping is complete to ensure that it operates properly.

Drywall and Sheetrock Repair

Don’t be concerned about the gaps in the wall or the removal of sheetrock parts. When the repiping project is finished, most seasoned contractors will repair any holes that have been developed and clean up after themselves.

When Do I Get My House Repiped?

It can be challenging to determine whether you have a localized plumbing problem or affects the entire plumbing system. If you’re having the following issues regularly, it’s time to think about repiping your house.

  • Leaking Pipes 
  • Low Water Pressure 
  • Corroded Pipes 
  • Rust
  • Colored Water 
  • Water with Extreme Temperature Changes 
  • Unexplained Pipe Noises
  • Pipes are emitting a foul odor.

Suppose you’re having any of the above problems regularly. In that case, it’s time to call an experienced repiping contractor before the problem worsens and causes severe damage to your house.

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We guarantee your 100% satisfaction with the plumbing services we offer. Our team of trustworthy, professional plumbers will ensure your home has abundant hot water, purified water at every tap in the house, and a reliable drain and sewer system to keep your home safe, healthy, and clean.
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